Call us on: +44
(0)1403 331331
  • slide 1
  • slide 2

Summers Place Auctions are the world's leading auctioneers of Sculpture and Design for the House and Garden.

Archive Catalogue:

Past catalogues are available to purchase from the Gallery.  Please e-mail info@summersplaceauctions.com for details.

This is Lot Number 3

Statuary: A rare Coade stone figure of Britannia

Estimated Price:
£1,500 - £2,500

Hammer Price:
£5,200

stamped Coade, Lambeth and dated 1788
damages
112cm.; 44ins high

Britannia was the Greek and Roman term for the geographical region of Great Britain or Great Britain and Ireland which was inhabited by the Britons and is the name given to the female personification of the island. During the reign of Charles II, Britannia made her first appearance on English coins on a farthing of 1672. With the constitutional unification of England with Scotland in 1707 and then with Ireland in 1800, Britannia became an increasingly important symbol and a strong rallying point among Britons. In the 1780's when this statue was made, the Royal Navy was the most powerful in the world and although now sadly missing this figure would almost certainly have held a trident similar to the figure of Britannia used on British coins. She is also depicted seated astride a globe of the world as befitting the nation's prominence as the leading world power.

This figure would almost certainly have been an individual commission for a building in the city of London, since the shield next to the seated figure depicts the arms of the City of London which is based on the flag of England, having a centred St George's Cross, with the sword in the upper hoist canton (the top left quarter). The sword is believed to represent the sword that beheaded Saint Paul who is the patron saint of the city.

Eleanor Coade (d.1821) opened her Lambeth Manufactory for ceramic artificial stone in 1769, and appointed the sculptor John Bacon as its manager two years later. She was employed by all the leading late 18th Century architects. From about 1777 she began her engraved designs, which were published in 1784 in a catalogue of over 700 items entitled A Descriptive Catalogue of Coade's Artificial Stone Manufactory. Then in 1799, the year she entered into partnership with her cousin John Sealy, she issued a handbook of her Pedlar's Lane exhibition Gallery. The firm became Coade and Sealey from this date and following Sealey's death in 1813, it reverted to Coade and in 1821 with the death of the younger Eleanor Coade, control of the firm passed to William Croggan, who died in 1835, following bankruptcy. Coade's manufactures resembling a fine-grained natural stone, have always been famed for their durability.

Coade are known to have produced a number of figures of Britannia, including one on top of the dome of Liverpool Town Hall modelled by one of Coade's leading modellers, J.C.F Rossi. Another was commissioned and made for the Custom House in London.

This is Lot Number 3

Summer Place Dropcap
Summers Art Advisory Services

Summers Place Collection is proud to offer an exclusive range of garden ornaments, available for purchase throughout the year. Traditional and contemporary pieces hand carved in stone, together with cutting-edge designs in stainless steel, give buyers the opportunity to purchase at a fixed price and in the quantity desired.
Click here to view our Collection

Summers Art Advisory Services, is an independent Art advisory agency offering comprehensive advice on a wide range of professional services for public bodies, private clients and companies. We seek to satisfy the evident demand for those wishing to sell, acquire or manage Art assets and combine all these categories.
Click here to view our Services

Our website uses four cookies. A cookie is a small file of letters and numbers that we put on your computer if you agree. These cookies allow us to distinguish you from other users of the website which helps us to provide you with a good experience when you browse our website and also allows us to improve our site.

The cookies we use are 'analytical' cookies. They allow us to recognise and count the number of visitors and to see how visitors move around the site when they’re using it. This helps us to improve the way our website works, for example by making sure users are finding what they need easily.

By continuing to use our website, you agree to the use of our cookies.